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Global Warming
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Author:  Snowy123 [ Wed Jun 13, 2012 3:51 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

spot1234 wrote:

I did not create that proof, it is proof It's a observable mechanism effecting the climate. your cosmic rays or whatever have not been observed doing anything to the atmosphere all you have is weak correlation.



Wrong once again.

http://hallolinden-db.de/files/2009.08. ... c_Rays.pdf

http://www.astrophys-space-sci-trans.ne ... 5-2011.pdf

There have been large changes in the atmospheric and climatic parameters during Forbush Decreases, suggesting a potent GCR-influence on the atmospheric parameters.

Author:  Snowy123 [ Wed Jun 13, 2012 4:07 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

It looks like Fabian decided to close TES Forums four days early.

RIP TES Forums. :cry:

Author:  Wayne Stollings [ Wed Jun 13, 2012 4:28 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Snowy123 wrote:
spot1234 wrote:

I did not create that proof, it is proof It's a observable mechanism effecting the climate. your cosmic rays or whatever have not been observed doing anything to the atmosphere all you have is weak correlation.



Wrong once again.

http://hallolinden-db.de/files/2009.08. ... c_Rays.pdf

http://www.astrophys-space-sci-trans.ne ... 5-2011.pdf

There have been large changes in the atmospheric and climatic parameters during Forbush Decreases, suggesting a potent GCR-influence on the atmospheric parameters.



Suggestions are not evidence of anything other than the possible basis of an hypothesis. The mechanisms have to be discovered prior to there being a cause for the effect or there may only be two effects related to a separate cause.

Author:  Milton Banana [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 12:36 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Another question if I may. Is there another heat source for the Earth other than the Sun?

Author:  Wayne Stollings [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 5:12 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Milton Banana wrote:
Another question if I may. Is there another heat source for the Earth other than the Sun?


The internal heat from the core adds a small amount, but the majority comes from the sun.

Author:  Ann Vole [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 9:34 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Wayne Stollings wrote:
Milton Banana wrote:
Another question if I may. Is there another heat source for the Earth other than the Sun?


The internal heat from the core adds a small amount, but the majority comes from the sun.
The core of the earth is powered by slow decay of radioactive metals as well as left-over heat from when our solar system was formed. It is a source of heat but the mile or two of cooled rock acts as insulation keeping the heat inside. Solar influences the temperature of the top 12 feet (roughly) of soil... that is, the few hot months raise the temperature down to that level then the few cool months cool that same 12 feet back down. Below that is the slow-moving heat from the core causing steady heat.

Another source of heat is gravity slowing down the earth and moon in the form of tides and possibly heating the core as well.

A small amount of ions and electrons hit the earth and heat up the atmosphere. Most of those particles come from our sun but some are left-over clouds of them from various arms of our galaxy or even other galaxies that can collide with our arm of the galaxy. No matter the source, they are attracted to the poles by the magnetism of the Earth (good thing we have a magnetic field in the earth and good thing the magnetic poles are near the rotation poles or we would be stripped of atmosphere by these particles) and produce the northern lights (and southern lights). We usually just add them to the sun's input but wanted to point out that some is interstellar clouds from other sources.

All of the galaxy is sending us some infrared radiation (and a bit of other radiation like light from stars) which warms a few degrees but that is a continuous thing and is radiated back out by us but has to be accounted for in the math

and finally you have some mechanical energy heating us (along with more radioactive metals) from meteorites hitting us.

Author:  Wayne Stollings [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 10:37 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Ann Vole wrote:
Wayne Stollings wrote:
Milton Banana wrote:
Another question if I may. Is there another heat source for the Earth other than the Sun?


The internal heat from the core adds a small amount, but the majority comes from the sun.
The core of the earth is powered by slow decay of radioactive metals as well as left-over heat from when our solar system was formed. It is a source of heat but the mile or two of cooled rock acts as insulation keeping the heat inside. Solar influences the temperature of the top 12 feet (roughly) of soil... that is, the few hot months raise the temperature down to that level then the few cool months cool that same 12 feet back down. Below that is the slow-moving heat from the core causing steady heat.


Except for the thermal vents/volcanic activity around the world, which does come to the surface.

Author:  Ann Vole [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 1:53 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Wayne Stollings wrote:
Except for the thermal vents/volcanic activity around the world, which does come to the surface.
the earth is like a giant water balloon so a bit of leakage of lava is surprisingly minor... as long as we avoid impacts with larger meteorites.

Author:  Fosgate [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 3:05 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Wayne Stollings wrote:
Milton Banana wrote:
Another question if I may. Is there another heat source for the Earth other than the Sun?


The internal heat from the core adds a small amount, but the majority comes from the sun.


Yep, and it actually warms us up more like a microwave than an electric or gas oven. Mercury, on the other hand...

Author:  Besoeker [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 4:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Wayne Stollings wrote:
The internal heat from the core adds a small amount, but the majority comes from the sun.

I think the bit inside maybe came from the sun in the first place.

Author:  Wayne Stollings [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 5:21 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Besoeker wrote:
Wayne Stollings wrote:
The internal heat from the core adds a small amount, but the majority comes from the sun.

I think the bit inside maybe came from the sun in the first place.


Maybe, but then again there is the theory the dwarves are building huge fires undgerground too. There are a couple of papers and lots of blogs supporting that new theory.

Author:  Iowanic [ Thu Jun 14, 2012 9:58 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Gnomes. They're called Gnomes, Wayne.


So TES has gone belly-up eh?

Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Fri Jun 15, 2012 9:56 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

It's the Mole Men! I saw them in a Superman episode when I was kid!

Author:  Milton Banana [ Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:14 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

Image

I have some questions about this Global Energy Budget. Every measurement is in Watts per square meter. 341 of shortwave radiation comes in. 102 of the shortwave is reflected back out. 239 IR going out. All outgoing adds up to 341. What comes in goes out. That makes sense. Here’s where things get a little muddy in my mind. 161 Wm^2 absorbed by the surface. But the surface releases almost twice the (356) watts per square meter of IR.

How is that possible? 356 Wm^2 is above the measured amount of shortwave radiation coming in from the Sun hence my last question in the post proceeding. "Is there another source of heat other than the Sun?"

Another question. Almost 100 percent of that release is back radiated 333 Wm^2.

How is it possible that according to this study the atmosphere (CO2?) is back radiating almost 100 percent of IR?

Author:  Milton Banana [ Sat Jun 16, 2012 1:02 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Global Warming

More questions. Does this study treat the Earth as a flat disk? Where is the night half in this study? Does this study take into consideration radiation hitting the equator is different than at 50 degrees north latitude? Angle of radiation is crucial as the season demonstrate. Is there any relation between heat transfer between the daylight and night time?

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