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Water Crisis 2014
http://www.envirolink.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=24535
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Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Sun Sep 28, 2014 12:15 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

Don't say I didn't tell you so in 2004:
California Drought Has 14 Communities on Brink of Waterlessness
Sep 26, 2014
http://insideclimatenews.org/breaking-n ... erlessness

Author:  Dingo [ Tue Sep 30, 2014 3:24 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

Egypt comes close to walking the plank on water. The Nile is pretty much it and it's mostly played out as the upper river countries are taking out their share. Still the population keeps rapidly growing. A bit of De-Nile here.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/egyp ... -1-3467217

Quote:
“You have population growth outstripping the ability of the agricultural sector to improve production, which is held back by land and water shortages.”

Egypt grows a large amount, including 7m tonnes of wheat a year, say traders, largely because Cairo offers farmers above-market prices to spur production.

Subsidised bread encourages Egyptians to consume more wheat per person than almost any other country, and demand is set to increase as the 87m population grows. There have been estimations of a population growth at 1.6m people a year.

Farms soak up 85 per cent of Egypt’s water, above global averages, says think-tank the World Water Council (WWC).

While improving yields and allocating more land to farmers could boost production, those measures will not keep up with growing demand, said Gamal Siam, an agricultural economist at Cairo University.

The Nile Valley, almost the only arable land, makes up 5 per cent of Egypt’s area but is home to 95 per cent of its people.

President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi will meet key ministers tomorrow to flesh out plans to reclaim about one billion hectares of desert land for farming.

Mr Siam said the “unrealistic” plan would need 80 billion cubic metres of water a year, more than all Egypt’s Nile waters.

Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Sat Oct 11, 2014 4:07 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

Global Frackdown
"The Global Frackdown is an international day of action initiated by Food & Water Watch to ban fracking —a risky technique that uses millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals to break open rock formations deep underground to release oil and gas. The oil and gas industry has spent millions of dollars on slick public relations campaigns and high-profile lobbying efforts to buy the ability to extract fossil fuels from our communities with as little government oversight as possible, all while destroying our air, water, health, communities and our climate.

While the industry is working hard to protect its profits and drown out the worldwide demand for clean, renewable fuels, there is a tremendous movement afoot around the world to protect our global resources from fracking."
http://www.globalfrackdown.org/about/

I wonder how much this will affect the vicious cycle. How will it actually be done along with the complete stopping of fossil fuel use and slash and burn agriculture, to stop the thermal event. Clearly, greed and stupidity will go on, unless the population crashes by 2024, either by geologic events or economic depression, and/or warfare. :- :- :- :- :mrgreen: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Author:  Dingo [ Tue Mar 10, 2015 5:35 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

More bad news on the water front. This article treats water problems comprehensively and has nearly the impact of a death sentence.

http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/03/10/ ... g-trouble/

Quote:
Already, water has turned nasty, pretty much throughout the world. In some places it is disappearing altogether. In fact, massive water stress within highly populated areas is likely to become the world’s greatest-ever migraine. Water wars are certain to follow.

São Paulo, a city of 20 million, where residential water taps are shut off daily at 1:00 P.M., could run dry within several months, nobody knows when for sure, but who knows where twenty million people will go.

Across the globe, millions of people wait patiently, sometimes not so patiently, in long lines to fill a plastic jug, or two, from water trucks. Often times the water is brackish, brownish, fouled.

In Karachi, Pakistan, the 3rd largest city in the world, parched protesters hit the streets because of the invariable unreliability of water trucks, often times delivering foul, brownish water. People become distraught. They protest.

Similar to Karachi, Mexico City (pop. 22 million) has water trucks deliver to neighborhoods where people line up with empty plastic jugs. Mexico City’s water problem is severe, according to Juan Jose Santibanez, environmental scientists: “There is a very high probability that, by 2020, there will be a mini-revolution, at least in Mexico City,” Gwen Ifill, Mexico City Faces Growing Water Crisis, NPR, Nov. 10, 2014.

Over time, depleted aquifers in Mexico City cause the ground to sink, buildings tilt.

Not only that, in the United States, because of aquifer depletion, the ground is sinking in San Joaquin Valley, California, “the food basket of the world.”

Istanbul’s (pop. 14 million) water reservoirs are at 22% of capacity.

One-half of China’s water resources are horribly polluted. In Beijing (pop. 12 million) water consumption is double the amount of local water availability.

India’s southern state of Tamil Nadu, one of the most significant agricultural states, has seen irrigated land crop production fall by 50% because of depletion of groundwater aquifers.


Desalination is often offered as the ace in the hole that will compensate for water depletion. San Diego gives us some idea of how far that will take us.

Quote:
San Diego (pop. 1.4 million) is scrambling to build a desalination plant at a cost of $1 billion, supplying the city with 7%-to-10% of its water needs by 2020, only 10% water for $1 billion on a project that takes nearly 15 years to complete!


And of course that is limited to the coast and will be using guess what as an energy source.

Author:  HeritageFarm [ Fri Mar 13, 2015 11:29 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

Here's some more bad news:
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-03-1 ... water-left

Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Sun Mar 15, 2015 3:36 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

I think in 2004** I said that CA would have the choice in ten years of flushing their toilets or letting the farmers grow their crops. About three years ago they chose to screw the farmers and let the increasing population keep flushing until they starve, I guess.
Back in the wild west days, water was fought over to the deaths of many. It will happen again with escaping Californians overloading every place they go.
I used the USGS info to tell Castro, Texas they will be out of water by 2018, and the perimeter of the Ogallala is and has been shrinking inward for a number of years. They said the aquifer will be gone by 2040, without allowing for more evap loss from CAGW. So it will be before, that 70 big cities lose their water supply, along with the entire breadbasket of the US. That alone could trigger crash/collapse. Too late to stop CAGW, if it isn't too late already.

**chap 29, "Immigration's Unarmed Invasion: Deadly Consequences", 2004 Wooldridge

Author:  Farmer [ Wed Mar 18, 2015 9:39 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

And so this saga continues

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/afte ... -dry-18562

We have friends in So.Cal, and the news they tell us is not good. Life and food growing in that area will change drastically this year without signifgant precipitation through 2015.

Some people actually think there is no link between this and climate change? Do they ever go outside ?
As climate patterns change they seem to get into longer ond longer term static periods of either one extreme or another, the jet is not behaving as it did for most of the past century. Where we live spring and fall have shifted to aproximately 3 weeks later than what we always considered normal, we now get months of zero precip followed by weeks of deluge. This is making dryland agriculture a huge challenge.
Maybe the Cal. situation really is just a harbinger of what lies ahead for many of us very soon?

Author:  Wayne Stollings [ Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:23 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Water Crisis 2014

Farmer wrote:
And so this saga continues

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/afte ... -dry-18562

We have friends in So.Cal, and the news they tell us is not good. Life and food growing in that area will change drastically this year without signifgant precipitation through 2015.

Some people actually think there is no link between this and climate change? Do they ever go outside ?
As climate patterns change they seem to get into longer ond longer term static periods of either one extreme or another, the jet is not behaving as it did for most of the past century. Where we live spring and fall have shifted to aproximately 3 weeks later than what we always considered normal, we now get months of zero precip followed by weeks of deluge. This is making dryland agriculture a huge challenge.
Maybe the Cal. situation really is just a harbinger of what lies ahead for many of us very soon?



The changing patterns is the biggest concern with climate change. Even if the averages of precipitation were to staty the same the effect on agriculture can be significant due to the change in when that precipitation falls. The movement of hardiness zones has been an indication of how the flora and farmers must adapt.

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