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Check out my blog
http://www.envirolink.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=24841
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Author:  HeritageFarm [ Fri Mar 06, 2015 1:59 am ]
Post subject:  Check out my blog

Hi everyone. I'm assuming everyone remembers me, that durn conservative environmentalist. Recently I've decided to start a blog. Well, technically, I just started it about a years or so ago, sat on it for quite a while, and then posted half of my material in the last week. Eventually it will become super popular I will become rich from the ads I will run! Or not... In any case, feel free to read it now and then. Most of my stuff is either fun, or related to climate change and the info is sourced from places like the Science and Nature journals, so I doubt I will do more than make grammar errors. Enjoy:
www.thepracticale.blogspot.com

Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Fri Mar 06, 2015 1:31 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Hi, Ted. I am also a green republican, and have 23 years as a foreman/supt/multi-tradesman
forms, frame, finish, along with electric and plumbing, tape and texture, etc., and also Irish.
I agree that the ice extent is from fresh water melt influx, but the actual volume of ice is still decreasing rapidly. The amount of open water in the summer has increased the water temperature and has been considered in runaway since 2007.
You will find this of interest;
http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2015/02 ... -2031.html
http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2014/09 ... gency.html

With so little progress toward mitigation, and the little time left to have an impact, I think the battle to save the biosphere is actually lost. The root cause is overpopulation grossly past sustainability, even if everyone turned green with solar power and no kids. I don't think the odds of reducing population enough in time, or enough green practices in time, are good.
The possibility of a 90+% crash before 2023 is there with the dollar collapse, Cascadia, La Palma or Katla, all due now, or soon.
If they occur after, then the only way to stop thermageddon is to blow Yellowstone with over a hundred drilled nukes. There also is the possibility that may not be enough, and Toba could also be blown ten years later to account for thermal momentum. Only then would there be a return to the interglacial and glacial cycles. At least with the minimum amount of radiation.
If the process actually stops at a Permian Extinction type scenario, then the recovery time could be 50 million years. We will not know, being extinct. :shock: :mrgreen:

Author:  Snowy123 [ Fri Mar 06, 2015 3:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Hi HF, and welcome. You probably remember me as well.

Author:  HeritageFarm [ Fri Mar 06, 2015 11:36 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Snowy123 wrote:
Hi HF, and welcome. You probably remember me as well.



Thanks, I appreciate it!

Author:  HeritageFarm [ Fri Mar 06, 2015 11:47 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Johhny Electriglide wrote:
Hi, Ted. I am also a green republican, and have 23 years as a foreman/supt/multi-tradesman
forms, frame, finish, along with electric and plumbing, tape and texture, etc., and also Irish.
I agree that the ice extent is from fresh water melt influx, but the actual volume of ice is still decreasing rapidly. The amount of open water in the summer has increased the water temperature and has been considered in runaway since 2007.
You will find this of interest;
http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2015/02 ... -2031.html
http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2014/09 ... gency.html

With so little progress toward mitigation, and the little time left to have an impact, I think the battle to save the biosphere is actually lost. The root cause is overpopulation grossly past sustainability, even if everyone turned green with solar power and no kids. I don't think the odds of reducing population enough in time, or enough green practices in time, are good.
The possibility of a 90+% crash before 2023 is there with the dollar collapse, Cascadia, La Palma or Katla, all due now, or soon.
If they occur after, then the only way to stop thermageddon is to blow Yellowstone with over a hundred drilled nukes. There also is the possibility that may not be enough, and Toba could also be blown ten years later to account for thermal momentum. Only then would there be a return to the interglacial and glacial cycles. At least with the minimum amount of radiation.
If the process actually stops at a Permian Extinction type scenario, then the recovery time could be 50 million years. We will not know, being extinct. :shock: :mrgreen:


Um ok, maybe the drilled nuking option is a little extreme? No offense, but that sounds kind of doomsday ish. While our environmental situation is indeed dire, I think there is still time to mitigate everyone's stupidity. Although I typocally refrain from calling them stupid, because it's not their fault our economy is oil based. However it is their fault for not taking swifter action on climate change.
I apologize for any errors, this iphone is not exactly super easy to type on.
Have you remodeled then? I'm about to be done with my first house. I did the ductwork, Sheetrock (hate that stuff), rewired stuff, did some plumbing (also not enjoyable in crawl spaces) and built my cabinets. Technically they're not done yet, but heck, I built em!

Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Sat Mar 07, 2015 3:39 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

"Have you remodeled then? I'm about to be done with my first house"
Yes, over a hundred homes up to million dollar remodel. Numerous business remodels, too.
Most as the multi-trade savvy foreman. Frame, finish, remodel, restoration, and repair. Mostly running top end framing crews, but some tract home shit, and I hate repairing rot or other people's mistakes.
Well, trying to blow Yellowstone and Toba are last resorts that do not have a really good chance of stopping Global Terminal Extinction. If it worked, then it would be similar to the bottleneck people went through 74,600 years ago with Toba. If you think of the magma chamber as a balloon of viscous material, with a thin top, some pressure from the bottom and forced pressure from the side, there would only be a super eruption with the pressure from the mantle. There may not be enough particulates to cool the planet enough, long enough. The only thing else, my friend, it to pray for a miracle from God to save our home. I don't want GTE to happen, either.

Author:  herlbert [ Mon Mar 09, 2015 6:51 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

I just been a member here for months, so maybe you don't remember me. Anyway, I visited your blog and I like most of your topic in blog.

Author:  HeritageFarm [ Wed Mar 11, 2015 12:32 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

No, you don't seem too familiar. I haven't been on here in quite a while, but I was very active one The Environment Site forum before it was shut down due to the fact that only me and about 5 other people actually got into arguments. At least, I think that was it. That and the site manager got tired of us I think. :-$

Author:  HeritageFarm [ Sat Apr 04, 2015 12:57 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

New post on bats and cave conservation.

Author:  Farmer [ Sat Apr 04, 2015 10:02 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Thanks for your blog, the world needs more of your kind of thinking.

Farmers used to be de facto environmentalists,their family's future depended upon the health of their land and their skill at working within the natural cycles, but that has sure changed in the last couple of generations.

Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Sun Apr 05, 2015 6:45 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

As a geo-nut, I loved spelunking. Mainly to get rid of my claustrophobia.
As the surface heats up, the ground heats up down lower and lower. Eventually it reaches the boiling point of water.
After several thousand years with no more water, the surface goes to 200*C and cooks out the CO2, down to equilibrium with inner rock temperature. So, only fossils will be left, if someone wants to come down and dig in an oven. Other evidence on the surface should be some man made metallic objects that do not oxidize or weather, or melt at the temperature max. :mrgreen:

Author:  herlbert [ Thu Apr 09, 2015 11:29 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

I never been experience spelunking yet though, it is my dream to do. I want to experience the temperature underground but, I don't want to turn out into roasted chicken afterwards. If the experience of that is like digging in an oven.

Author:  Wayne Stollings [ Fri Apr 10, 2015 6:12 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Caves get very little temperature change from even seasonal variation of surface temperature due to heat transfer through the rock. The same is true from the opposite direction too. The heat does increase ever so slightly as you go deeper if all other variables are equal (air flow for example) so it takes a great depth to become uncomfortably warm. That is why for a long time it was thought that caves had a constant temperature, but deep mines did not. In these very deep mines the temperature of the rock is hot to the touch. The deepest mine in South Africa approaches 12,000 feet deep and the rocks are about 60 degrees C (140 F) at the lowest point. Compared to caves where the temperature may be as low as 10 C (50 F) there is a very low temperature gradient for depth.

Author:  Wayne Stollings [ Fri Apr 10, 2015 6:12 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Caves get very little temperature change from even seasonal variation of surface temperature due to heat transfer through the rock. The same is true from the opposite direction too. The heat does increase ever so slightly as you go deeper if all other variables are equal (air flow for example) so it takes a great depth to become uncomfortably warm. That is why for a long time it was thought that caves had a constant temperature, but deep mines did not. In these very deep mines the temperature of the rock is hot to the touch. The deepest mine in South Africa approaches 12,000 feet deep and the rocks are about 60 degrees C (140 F) at the lowest point. Compared to caves where the temperature may be as low as 10 C (50 F) there is a very low temperature gradient for depth.

Author:  Johhny Electriglide [ Fri Apr 10, 2015 3:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Check out my blog

Our 'underground' (6' down and more) temperature is 50*F here, but it is 110*F in the deepest Cripple Creek mines near here. From 2006 or so, there was an article on ground temperature measurements around the world, and it has heated up 1*F as of that time, down to 300'.
Your usual recreation cave will be nice and cool inside, dirty near the entry, but clean as you get in 1/2 km. The biggest problem is maintaining orientation, plenty of lights, and a good helmet, to miss out on all the lumps I got. There are a lot of really nice caves in the world. One I saw today on the net is on the Chile-Argentina border, all blue marble with a lake bordering and into it. Although, you usually do not have to go far to find one. Your local Speleology club would be good to contact. :mrgreen:

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