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 Post subject: Re: Garden info
PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 4:05 pm 
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Fast, too.


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 Post subject: Re: Garden info
PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 3:30 pm 
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Here's one I need to revive....

I never did finish a complete rotation at that settlement. Lotta work involved, but maybe I can make another go at it.


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 Post subject: Re: Garden info
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 9:25 am 
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Here's a faverite in need of bumping...


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 Post subject: Re: Garden info
PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 12:00 pm 
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Why ensile?
It is a power hungry way to make feed. Cut rake and bale. If things get close you can use a bale wrapper to make baleage.
But dry hay is the way to go....why haul all that water around?
All a bale needs is a hoop house and you could get double duty from any you would have over the gardens........

Corn can be used as whole kernels for the goats and it will be fully utilized, even with cows the loss is less than 5% if you use whole kernels so if power requirements are tight you can just feed it whole instead of cracking or rolling.
Oats are nice for horses and goats but the outer husk contains a lot of fiber and thus reduces the amount of nutrients per pound of dry matter for the cows.
Barley is a good feed and will grow on marginal soil. It can replace around half of any corn in a cows ration. Plus you'll need it for the beer :mrgreen:
The fodder left over from the corn crop can be baled and used as bedding as can any straw from the cereal crops. Or in tight times you can feed it to the beef animals to get them through, although more grain would be needed.
It could also be used as fuel for heat. Lots of old time steam engines were designed to burn straw on the prairie since wood was scarce.

I would look very carefully at losing some of the cows and using more goats. You will be producing roughly 2 kids per nanny every year half of which will be males and they are very edible.
You can usually run 6 goats in the area needed for 1 cow. There are both meat and milk breeds and world wide are far more prevalent than cows. They can be trained to pull small carts and can be used as pack animals.

Forget the "broiler" or "layer"chickens. Focus on a couple of the larger "dual purpose" birds. I usually do not advocate dual purpose but to save space needed for the breeding stock, a bunch of Barred Rocks and Buff Orpingtons will give you a lot of bang for the buck. Modern broilers are a cross breed that will not breed true, you need several other breeds to get those birds. And Leghorns that lay lots of nice white eggs are totally useless for any kind of meat.

As for rotation in the gardens you shouldn't be too worried about the legumes providing all the N. You will be making plenty of manure and should have big community compost piles working. Legumes do add N but the first year I don't believe the contribution is as great as it would be the next and since garden legumes are usually a one year deal it's not that big of a deal. Even in farming typically there will be a bigger N credit from a stand of alfalfa than for soybeans.

Brassicas should be rotated though to prevent club root and this is a big family.

Hammer that manure in for fall and in the spring plant your corn or potatoes.
Next year you can run roots, then your legumes such as beans and peas. Then you can run the brassicas.
You should be testing and adding stuff as needed, lime or sulfur to balance your Ph, extra N, P, or K etc....
Plant your squashes and pumpkins right on the manure piles.

This is a very general rotation and there are lots of plants I omitted. They can be worked in here and there as their feeding habits allow, for instance plant tomatoes on the second year to avoid big bushy less fruitful plants....

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 Post subject: Re: Garden info
PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:17 pm 
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Thanx for the info, Sammy.


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 Post subject: Re: Garden info
PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 1:45 am 
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The last real "garden info" in this thread was several years ago!!!!! :-$ :-& =; #-o ](*,) :razz:

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