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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:44 pm 
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GoGreenCO wrote:
Solar panels also require people to be roofers which is a dangerous job, although roofers exist anyways.

Another advantage would be private ownership which ties in with bills.

http://greenreview.blogspot.com/2012/01 ... gy-is.html

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There is another interesting facet of the German renewable energy saga: 51% of all renewable energy in Germany is owned by individual citizens or farms, totaling $100 billion worth of private investment in clean energy.

BS!!! DIY!!! Use your brains!!!

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:47 pm 
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Abraham wrote:
To reduce the complete electricity bill, the cost of setting up such panel will be huge! Because, the efficiency of Solar panel is very Low, only about 23.5% (Highest till date)! This is the main disadvantage of a Solar panel. Otherwise, this is the ultimate source of Free electricity along with being environment friendly. The problem of getting Power in night may also be solved as I read somewhere that scientists are now trying to get power from the Infrared ray of Sun! Then electricity can be produced in night too!

How stupid can you get?? Ever heard of big batteries??? So what about efficiency, it just means solar can use a smaller amount of the more than enough space already on the roof, if it faces south. Cost huge?? Yeah if you are too stupid to get the best deal and hire high buck asswipes to do the work for you!!!

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:53 pm 
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Johhny Electriglide wrote:
tsmg143 wrote:
What are the advantage(s) and disadvantage(s) of solar panel? (poor English Tsmg)

I think Solar energy is renewable power source, clean and ECO friendly.The advantage(s) and disadvantage(s) are listed below:

Advantages:-
1.Reduce or completely eliminate your electric bill.>>>{{{the savings can go to paying off the mortgage or other debts, or go to investments}}}JE
2.Solar systems are long lasting.
3.No noise or smells, solar operates totally silent.
4.Solar panel can provide power to the most remote locations etc.
{{5. Solar energy is renewable power source, clean and ECO friendly}}JE
Disadvantages:-
1.Initial cost of solar panel system is high.>>>{{Not too high if you have a reasonably sized system and do it yourself, plus buy components on sale}}JE
2.Solar panel set up require large areas of land.>>>{{Not really, pole mount and roof mount systems don't require land}}JE
3.Electricity can not produced at night, and less production on cloudy/rainy days.>>>{{That is why we have battery bank systems large enough to last for the average amount of cloudy days that can be expected, and, of course, provide power at night}}}JE

I want know more advantages and disadvantages related to Solar panel so please share your informative views about this post.............

You see in my notes above that there are few disadvantages to solar power except for a >>bad location<< or >>people not energetic and bright enough to do it themselves<<. >>People with a bad credit rating and low on cash, or with a low paying job will also have difficulty.<<
>>There are many profiteers to avoid, and grid tied systems are often not only more expensive, but the utilities don't pay enough, and even have monthly fees for hook up, even if you use none of their electric.<<
Independent homes and businesses are clearly the most efficient, with mini-grids second. The miles of wires and steel supports in the big grid are a waste of refined metal, and unsightly. Solar panels look cool. :mrgreen:

THAT says it ALL!!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 10:29 pm 
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Besoeker wrote:
And solar PV is less effective at northern latitudes which is where most people live.
wrong on two accounts... Up here in Canada there are not very many people and even less when you go further north. PV is damaged by heat so keeping the panels cool keeps their efficiency higher. Because the sun is always on the south side of the place, tracking mechanisms are less necessary or most Canadian installations just face them south at about a 20-30 degree angle (from vertical) and bolt them in place. They are more efficient, last longer and highly effective up here in the north.


Last edited by Ann Vole on Sun Jun 10, 2012 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 11:32 pm 
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Johhny Electriglide wrote:
Abraham wrote:
To reduce the complete electricity bill, the cost of setting up such panel will be huge! Because, the efficiency of Solar panel is very Low, only about 23.5% (Highest till date)! This is the main disadvantage of a Solar panel. Otherwise, this is the ultimate source of Free electricity along with being environment friendly. The problem of getting Power in night may also be solved as I read somewhere that scientists are now trying to get power from the Infrared ray of Sun! Then electricity can be produced in night too!

How stupid can you get?? Ever heard of big batteries??? So what about efficiency, it just means solar can use a smaller amount of the more than enough space already on the roof, if it faces south. Cost huge?? Yeah if you are too stupid to get the best deal and hire high buck asswipes to do the work for you!!!


Abuse.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 11:53 pm 
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Abraham wrote:
The problem of getting Power in night may also be solved as I read somewhere that scientists are now trying to get power from the Infrared ray of Sun! Then electricity can be produced in night too!
Found it! Yeah the hype is that they may produce some electricity from night-time infrared light but that would be stuff reflected off of CO2 and clouds. The amount compared to daytime sun-based light (including the infrared) would be much less and likely not cost effective to have enough to power things at night. (you will still need batteries)

http://www.groovygreen.com/groove/?p=2385
https://inlportal.inl.gov/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=1269&mode=2&featurestory=DA_101047
http://www.gizmag.com/researchers-developing-solar-technology-that-works-at-night/8574/


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 5:40 am 
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In terms of peak oil, one disadvantage is that it involves an energy trap:

http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/201 ... ergy-trap/


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 6:28 am 
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ralfy wrote:
In terms of peak oil, one disadvantage is that it involves an energy trap:

http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/201 ... ergy-trap/



Very interesting presentation.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 5:00 pm 
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ralfy wrote:
In terms of peak oil, one disadvantage is that it involves an energy trap:

http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/201 ... ergy-trap/
I like that energy trap explanation but there are two aspects that were overlooked. The end of the discussion was about the need of liquid fuels for transportation. Transportation accounts for roughly 1/5 of total energy use and is almost all liquid fuels as it is. We only need to reduce the remaining 80% of energy uses enough to handle the gradual increase in transportation needs PLUS the decline in available liquid fuels available to keep our transportation in liquid form. The other more important point is "negawatts"... energy we no longer need due to efficiency. negawatts, just like other forms of energy require energy to get the infrastructure in place to get that increased efficiency. Some examples would be insulation, fluorescent and LED lights, hybrid cars, better windows and doors, reduced use of Portland concrete, local foods (less transportation), efficient refrigerators. Each of these has an energy cost as well as an energy savings. I would suspect many will get past that 40:1 ratio that we need for that argument of how to get out of the energy trap. Another form of "negawatts" is market forces. When fuel prices started rising, department stores bought lots of storage and stocked up to reduce their need for shipping eventually. The problem was when their stockpiles were made, they stopped shipping stuff and shipping companies went out of business for lack of business. The sudden drop in fuel use by ships resulted in a glut in fuel and fuel prices plummeted. The result is that bigger and more fuel-efficient ships are being made by the companies that used to order shipping outside their company. These fuel efficient ships result in a long term reduction in fuel use. I could also site a number of other fuel-use industries that have done the same reduction in fuel use due to the volatility of fuel prices. Two that you may not have heard much about are agriculture reducing fertilizer use (lots of energy use and farmers must pay half a year before they can cash in with increased yields... they switch to adding alfalfa seeds to their wheat crops which provides nitrogen to the roots) and "zero till" farming to reduce tractor trips (but requires bigger equipment and bigger tractors but with a net fuel savings). The other industry is forestry and it's high-energy kiln processing and transportation being replaced with orientated strand board and fast growing tree species that can be harvested quicker and made with wet wood (some drying in the manufacturing process but drying after construction has no shrinkage problems). My final point brings the discussion back to solar panels: Turbines are not very efficient (the best for coal are 35% and natural gas up to 60%) and power lines eat up more then half the energy (they say less but they are only accounting for 1 or 2 of the 9 forms of loss). This means that for every watt that a solar roof installation produces which is also used locally results in 3-5 watts worth of fuel that is not burned.
Quote:
solar photovoltaics are estimated to require 3–4 years’ worth of energy output to fabricate, including the frames and associated electronics systems. Assuming a 30–40 year lifetime, this translates into an EROEI around 10:1
so you can change that ratio to somewhere between 30:1 and 50:1... close to the required 40:1 to get out of the energy trap.


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